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Monthly Archives: December 2014

Stonehenge discovery could rewrite British pre-history

Stonehenge News and Information

The most important discovery at Stonehenge for a generation could be destroyed by David Cameron’s plan to build a tunnel at the World Heritage Site

David Cameron announced plans to route the A303 into a tunnel to take traffic away from the world heritage site of Stonehenge Photo: AP David Cameron announced plans to route the A303 into a tunnel to take traffic away from the world heritage site of Stonehenge Photo: AP

Archaeologists have discovered the earliest settlement at Stonehenge – but the Mesolithic camp could be destroyed if government plans for a new tunnel go ahead.

Charcoal dug up from the ‘Blick Mead’ encampment, a mile and a half from Stonehenge, dates from around 4,000BC. It is thought the site was originally occupied by hunter gatherers returning to Britain after the Ice Age, when the country was still connected to the continent.

Experts say the discovery could re-write history in prehistoric Britain.

There is also evidence of feasting – burnt flints and remains of giant bulls – aurochs – as well…

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Old Sarum archaeologists reveal plan of medieval city

A detailed plan of a medieval city has been produced by experts without any digging at the site.

The latest scanning techniques were used to uncover a network of buildings at the 11th Century Old Sarum near Salisbury in Wiltshire.

The inner and outer baileys of the Old Sarum Iron Age fort were surveyed

The inner and outer baileys of the Old Sarum Iron Age fort were surveyed

The results include a series of large structures, possibly defences, with open areas of ground behind possibly for mustering resources or people.

Old Sarum was the original site of Salisbury, which is two miles away

Old Sarum
Old Sarum lies two miles north of the modern-day city of Salisbury, Wiltshire
Students carry out research at Old Sarum
Students from the University of Southampton spent the summer on site

WHAT IS OLD SARUM?

  • It was the location of the original Salisbury
  • It combines a royal castle and cathedral within an Iron Age fortification
  • The Romans, Normans and Saxons have all left their mark there
  • For 150 years it was a major centre of government

Source: English Heritage

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It was originally an Iron Age fort, established around 400 BC, and occupied by the Romans after the conquest of Britain in AD 43.

This latest survey of the site was carried out by the University of Southampton and concentrated on the inner and outer baileys of what would have been the fort.

Modern techniques used to survey the land included magnetometry, earth resistance, ground penetrating radar and electric resistivity tomography, which uses electrodes to probe underground.

The university’s director of archaeological prospection services, Kristian Strutt, said: “Archaeologists and historians have known for centuries that there was a medieval city at Old Sarum, but until now there has been no proper plan of the site.

“Our survey shows where individual buildings are located and from this we can piece together a detailed picture of the urban plan within the city walls.”

Full Story: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-wiltshire-30300837

We operate guided tours from Salisbury that visit Old Sarum and Stonehenge

Stonehenge and Salisbury Guided Tours
http://www.StonehengeTravel.co.uk

Current Archaeology Awards: and the nominations are as follows…

The Heritage Journal

It’s that time of year again. With just 3 months to go before the Current Archaeology Live! conference in London, the nominations for the Current Archaeology Awards have been released.

CALive

The awards are designed to celebrate some of the stories and people featured in the magazine throughout the course of the year. There is no panel of judges, the only votes that count are those from the readership in the public vote via the website, so it really is just down to you (collectively) as to who the winners are.

As in previous years, there are four main categories to vote for:

  • Research Project of the Year
  • Archaeologist of the Year
  • Rescue Dig of the Year
  • Book of the Year

The nominees in each category are as follows:

Research Project of the Year

  • How to build a dolmen: exploring Neolithic construction at Garn Turne
  • Maryport’s mystery monuments: investigating gigantic timber…

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