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How many people did it take to build Stonehenge? Volunteers drag ONE-TONNE concrete slab to recreate Stone Age effort

 

  • Volunteers dragged the a concrete slab using neolithic-style wooden sled
  • The slab weighed half as much as the smallest blue stone at Stonehenge
  • A video appears to show 20 people pulling the slab along logs with ropes
  • Organisers looked to ancient wooden sleds from Asia and non-industrialised cultures for monument building as inspiration

By Abigail Beall and Ryan O’Hare for MailOnline

Towering above the grassy Salisbury Plain, its eerie rock monoliths are steeped in myth and magical stories, yet despite decades of research the original purpose of Stonehenge remains a mystery.

ucl-henge

Towering above the grassy Salisbury Plain, its eerie rock monoliths are steeped in myth and magical stories, yet despite decades of research the original purpose of Stonehenge remains a mystery. But UK researchers have tried to answer one of the many logistical questions surrounding the beginnings of the monument – how many people it took to build it. In an effort to to solve the quandary, UK researchers recruited a group of volunteers to recreate the Neolithic building efforts, by dragging a one-tonne slab of concrete using logs and rope.

But UK researchers have tried to answer one of the many logistical questions surrounding the beginnings of the monument – how many people it took to build it.

In an effort to to solve the quandary, UK researchers recruited a group of volunteers to recreate the Neolithic building efforts, by dragging a one-tonne slab of concrete using logs and rope.

Towering above the grassy Salisbury Plain, its eerie rock monoliths are steeped in myth and magical stories, yet despite decades of research the original purpose of Stonehenge remains a mystery.

But UK researchers have tried to answer one of the many logistical questions surrounding the beginnings of the monument – how many people it took to build it.

In an effort to to solve the quandary, UK researchers recruited a group of volunteers to recreate the Neolithic building efforts, by dragging a one-tonne slab of concrete using logs and rope

Read the full story and watch the video here

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Stonehenge experiment needs volunteers to help lift one tonne block

Stonehenge News and Information

Take part in Stonehenge experiment: How many people does it take to lift one block?

stonehenge1308 Heavy lifting: the smallest stones at the prehistoric site weigh about two tonnes REUTERS/Kieran Doherty

Anyone who has wondered what it took to lift a piece of Stonehenge into place has a chance to have a go themselves in a mass experiment.

Experts from University College London are seeking volunteers to help them lift a replica stone using prehistoric technology and brute strength.

Doctoral student Barney Harris, who is organising the event in Gordon Square near the UCL campus on Monday, said he believed it would take 40 to 50 people to lift a single stone, which at one tonne is half the weight of the smallest block at Stonehenge.

Mr Harris said: “We will be using a model of a sledge that might have been used, but other than that it will be people…

View original post 94 more words

Anglo-Saxon cemetery teeming with ‘fascinating’ objects is unearthed near Stonehenge for the second time in a month.

  • The 1,300-year-old cemetery was found on land marked for development 
  • Cemetery of 55 graves dates to the late 7th and early 8th century AD
  • The majority of the items found in graves were small iron knives 
  • Combs, pins made of bone, beads and pierced coins were also found

Salisbury Plain may be best known for Stonehenge, but the chalk plateau has revealed other, more hidden secrets over the past month.

In April an Anglo Saxon cemetery of around 150 graves holding beautiful grave goods was unearthed in Bulford, Wiltshire.

saxon-grave

The 1,300-year-old Anglo-Saxon cemetery was discovered on land marked for a £70 ($102) million housing development for army families. The cemetery of about 55 graves (one pictured) dates back to the late 7th and early 8th century AD

And now, another cemetery has been discovered with 55 graves, just 7 miles (11km) down the road in the village of Tidworth.

The 1,300-year-old Anglo-Saxon cemetery was discovered on land marked for a £70 ($102) million housing development for army families.

The cemetery of 55 graves dates back to the late 7th and early 8th century AD.

Most of the the burials contained personal effects or significant items.

The majority of the items were small iron knives, although other finds included combs, pins made of bone, beads and pierced coins thought to form necklaces. There were also several spearheads.

The land, in Tidworth, Wiltshire, is part of a new housing development to build 322 new homes for Army families.

Read the full story in the Daily Mail

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