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A Bronze Age ‘beaker culture’ invaded Britain 4,000 years ago: Intruders forced out ancient farmers that built famous relics such as Stonehenge

 

  • New research carried out one of the biggest ever studies of ancient genomes 
  • It found that beaker people forced prehistoric Neolithic farmers out of Britain
  • DNA analyses found that Britain underwent a 90 per cent shift in its genetic make-up when the beaker folk arrived

One of the biggest ever studies of ancient genomes has found that a Bronze Age ‘beaker culture’ invaded Britain around 4,000 years ago.

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This graphic from a beaker folk study in 2007 shows the spread of beaker culture across Europe. Red represents some of the ancient DNA sample sites found, while purple shows bell-shaped beaker artefacts that have been discovered across the continent

The immigrant group, named after the famous bell-shaped pots they carried, likely forced out native Neolithic farmers.

These ancient British farmers were famed for leaving behind massive rock relics, including Stonehenge.

THE BEAKER CULTURE MYSTERY

Beaker folk lived about 4,500 years ago in the temperate zones of Europe.

They received their name from their distinctive bell-shaped beakers, decorated in horizontal zones by finely toothed stamps.

The decorated pots are almost ubiquitous across Europe, and could have been used as drinking vessels or ceremonious urns.

Believed to be originally from Spain, the Beaker folk soon spread into central and western Europe in their search for metals.

But the sheer variety of beaker artefacts across Europe has made the pottery difficult to define as coming from one distinctive culture.

The new study suggests the beaker culture did not always pass from a single migrating entity.

DNA samples from beaker folk in Iberia and Central Europe were found to be genetically distinct.

To me, that’s definitely surprising,’ Dr Pontus Skoglund, a population geneticist at Harvard Medical School in Boston, Massachusetts, who was not involved in the study, told Nature News.

‘The people who built Stonehenge probably didn’t contribute any ancestry to later people, or if they did, it was very little.’

Around 4,500 years ago bell-shaped pottery became popular across much of prehistoric Europe.

The Bronze Age trend has been debated by archaeologists for over a century.

Some argue that it was simply a fashion trend shared by several distinct cultural groups.

But other suggest that an immense migration of ‘beaker folk’ spread across the continent.

The new ancient genome research suggests that both theories are true.

The study, led by researchers at Harvard Medical School, analysed the DNA of 170 ancient Europeans.

They compared this DNA to the genomes of hundreds of other modern and prehistoric Europeans.

Ancient skeletons found in the Iberian peninsula were found to share little genetic connection with bones found in central Europe.
By HARRY PETTIT FOR MAILONLINE
Read the full story n the Daily Mail online

Join us on a guided tour exploring the prehistoric landscape around Stonehenge.

The local Stonehenge Experts
http://www.StonehengeTravel.co.uk

 

2017 Stonehenge Private Guided Access Tours departing from Salisbury

Be one of the few people to walk amongst the inner stone circle at Stonehenge on our exclusive special access trips.

What better way to experience the magic and mystery of Stonehenge than with a private viewing at sunrise or sunset. On our popular exclusive private guided tours from Salisbury, guests will be able to access the historic stone circle, and explore the surrounding area rich in history, myths and legends.  We are proud to be the longest established Stonehenge Tour Company operating the very 1st special access tours into the monument.  Please view our exclusive Stonehenge inner circle tours

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“Being able to walk amongst the stones at dawn without the crowds and without the rope barrier is a truly magical experience”

Our exclusive entry into the stone circle allows you to wander in and around the heritage site and experience an up close and personal look at this iconic monument.  We have scheduled small group tours and arrange custom private tours.  Please visit our travel website for details.

Stonehenge at Sunrise or Sunset

In the evening after Stonehenge is closed to the public, or at dawn before it is open, we can arrange for you to visit this awe-inspiring prehistoric monument and walk among the giant sarsen stones towering 6.4 m high and weighing up to 50 tonnes. Marvel at how stones of such monumental scale were quarried, transported and erected 5,000 years ago when the only tools available were made of wood, bone and stone.

For those of you who have not visited Stonehenge, we should mention that the complex is roped off. Visitors observe the stones from a distance and are not permitted within the Stone Circle which can be somewhat frustrating. Our private special access tours allow you to be amongst the stones.

Please follow us on Twitter for all the latest Stonehenge and Salisbury tourism news and Instagram for Stonehenge and Wiltshire photos.

Stonehenge and Salisbury Guided Tours
www.StonehengeTravel.co.uk
Approve Visit Wiltshire Member

How many people did it take to build Stonehenge? Volunteers drag ONE-TONNE concrete slab to recreate Stone Age effort

 

  • Volunteers dragged the a concrete slab using neolithic-style wooden sled
  • The slab weighed half as much as the smallest blue stone at Stonehenge
  • A video appears to show 20 people pulling the slab along logs with ropes
  • Organisers looked to ancient wooden sleds from Asia and non-industrialised cultures for monument building as inspiration

By Abigail Beall and Ryan O’Hare for MailOnline

Towering above the grassy Salisbury Plain, its eerie rock monoliths are steeped in myth and magical stories, yet despite decades of research the original purpose of Stonehenge remains a mystery.

ucl-henge

Towering above the grassy Salisbury Plain, its eerie rock monoliths are steeped in myth and magical stories, yet despite decades of research the original purpose of Stonehenge remains a mystery. But UK researchers have tried to answer one of the many logistical questions surrounding the beginnings of the monument – how many people it took to build it. In an effort to to solve the quandary, UK researchers recruited a group of volunteers to recreate the Neolithic building efforts, by dragging a one-tonne slab of concrete using logs and rope.

But UK researchers have tried to answer one of the many logistical questions surrounding the beginnings of the monument – how many people it took to build it.

In an effort to to solve the quandary, UK researchers recruited a group of volunteers to recreate the Neolithic building efforts, by dragging a one-tonne slab of concrete using logs and rope.

Towering above the grassy Salisbury Plain, its eerie rock monoliths are steeped in myth and magical stories, yet despite decades of research the original purpose of Stonehenge remains a mystery.

But UK researchers have tried to answer one of the many logistical questions surrounding the beginnings of the monument – how many people it took to build it.

In an effort to to solve the quandary, UK researchers recruited a group of volunteers to recreate the Neolithic building efforts, by dragging a one-tonne slab of concrete using logs and rope

Read the full story and watch the video here

Join us on a Stonehenge guided tour and here all the  latest theories from our local experts

Stonehenge and Salisbury Guided Tours
http://www.StonehengeTravel.co.uk

 

Anglo-Saxon cemetery teeming with ‘fascinating’ objects is unearthed near Stonehenge for the second time in a month.

  • The 1,300-year-old cemetery was found on land marked for development 
  • Cemetery of 55 graves dates to the late 7th and early 8th century AD
  • The majority of the items found in graves were small iron knives 
  • Combs, pins made of bone, beads and pierced coins were also found

Salisbury Plain may be best known for Stonehenge, but the chalk plateau has revealed other, more hidden secrets over the past month.

In April an Anglo Saxon cemetery of around 150 graves holding beautiful grave goods was unearthed in Bulford, Wiltshire.

saxon-grave

The 1,300-year-old Anglo-Saxon cemetery was discovered on land marked for a £70 ($102) million housing development for army families. The cemetery of about 55 graves (one pictured) dates back to the late 7th and early 8th century AD

And now, another cemetery has been discovered with 55 graves, just 7 miles (11km) down the road in the village of Tidworth.

The 1,300-year-old Anglo-Saxon cemetery was discovered on land marked for a £70 ($102) million housing development for army families.

The cemetery of 55 graves dates back to the late 7th and early 8th century AD.

Most of the the burials contained personal effects or significant items.

The majority of the items were small iron knives, although other finds included combs, pins made of bone, beads and pierced coins thought to form necklaces. There were also several spearheads.

The land, in Tidworth, Wiltshire, is part of a new housing development to build 322 new homes for Army families.

Read the full story in the Daily Mail

Stonehenge and Salisbury Guided Tours
http://www.StonehengeTravel.co.uk

Discover the historic gems on our doorstep

YOU can travel back in time on this holiday and trace thousands of years of British history, from Stonehenge up to the signing of the Magna Carta.

Visit Salisbury Cathedral, is unique among English medieval cathedrals having been built in a single architectural style - early English gothic.

Visit Salisbury Cathedral, is unique among English medieval cathedrals having been built in a single architectural style – early English gothic.

From the famous standing stones through to the celebrated document inspired by King John and the Georgian streets of Bath, this is a trip that will no doubt fascinate and delight.

After boarding the private coach in the early morning you will travel towards your hotel, visiting the quant villages of Castle Combe and Laycock along the way.

Both have featured in major films and TV series, Castle Combe in Stephen Spielberg’s War Horse and Lacock was used in some scenes for the Harry Potter films. Lacock also featured in the popular TV programme The Cranford Chronicles.

After dinner and a chance to relax in the hotel, day two will be all about Stonehenge, where you’ll head after breakfast.

The first stop of the day is the famous standing stones and its long-awaited and now open exhibition and visitor centre.

The exhibition contains nearly 300 archaelogical treasures found in the area, and also valuable insights into how and why the stone circle was built, and the people responsible.

The monument itself is a little over a mile from the centre, so you will have the choice of walking to it with a complementary audio guide or using the shuttle for the ride to the stones.

After seeing the stones, you will then travel to Salisbury Cathedral, which is unique among English medieval cathedrals having been built in a single architectural style – early English gothic.

The Chapter House here is home to the finest of only four surviving Magna Carta, the first formal document of its kind that paved the way for democracy. An exhibition explaints how it came about, and what its significance is even today.

On day three you will head to Bath and enjoy a full day at leisure in this fine city, which boasts its famous Roman baths, the Royal Crescent and beautiful Pulteney Bridge.

After breakfast the following day you will enjoy a brief tour of the Cotswolds, including the charming village of Malmesbury, before heading home.

Full Article in the excellent Bristol Post: http://www.bristolpost.co.uk/Discover-historic-gems-doorstep/story-25845069-detail/story.html#ixzz3OmEXVcC8

We operate guided tours including Stonehenge, Salisbury, Lacock, Castle Combe, Bath and the Cotswolds

Stonehenge Travel Co.
Mystical Landscape, Magical Tours
http://www.StonehengeTravel.co.uk

Stonehenge Community Open Days: 20th February and 20th March

There are still some spaces left for the 20th February and 20th March open days from 12pm -2pm at the new Stonehenge Visitor Centre. These are free events but you must pre book and call 0870 3331183 stating Stonehenge Community Open Days as the event you want to book onto.  You can book up to 4 people and must be a Wiltshire resident.

The Stonehenge Learning and Outreach Group with ourselves, Salisbury and South Wiltshire Museum, English Heritage Stonehenge open daysWiltshire Museum Devizes, Wessex Archaeology and National Trust will meet this week and share their learning events that are happening too.

Join us for a series of open days for the local community at the new Stonehenge visitor centre, featuring a special tour with Susan Greaney, Senior Properties Historian and Lisa Holmes, Community Projects manager.

Come and find out about the making of the exhibition, the opportunities for local voices to contribute to future exhibitions and how you will be able to make use of the centre for learning events.

www.english-heritage.org.uk/stonehenge

Community Heritage Ambassador
Stonehenge and Salisbury Guided Tours

 

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