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Visit Salisbury Cathedral and Medieval City this Christmas.

Centred on a majestic cathedral that’s topped by the tallest spire in Europe, Salisbury makes an appealing Wiltshire base. It’s been an important provincial city for more than a 1000 years, and its streets form an architectural timeline ranging from medieval walls and half-timbered Tudor town houses to Georgian mansions and Victorian villas.

xmAS-S-2019Whilst visiting Salisbury this Christmas, be sure to explore this truly beautiful city and all that it has to offer.

Set in the centre of the beautiful City of Salisbury, The Salisbury Christmas Market is a wonderful collection of artisan products, festive gifts and tantalizing food and drink from across the South West.

This year we are also delighted to announce our all-weather real ice rink will be situated alongside our Christmas Market, bringing great festive fun for all ages.

Come and join us for a truly Christmas in Salisbury festive experience

Visit the Salisbury Christmas website for full details

From Darkness to Light Illuminations at Salisbury Cathedral

xmas-2
This Advent and Christmas Salisbury Cathedral and Close will be transformed inside and outside, with illuminated art installations on the West Walk, in the North Porch, on the Cloister Garth and in the Cathedral itself.

Visitors approaching the Cathedral via the West walk will encounter Light Wave by Squidsoup, the team behind Enlightenment, the stunning installation that hung in the North Porch during our Magna Carta celebrations in 2015. This immersive walk-through experience comprises 500 light and audio spheres, suspended in a 20-metre wave formation, which softly glow and play plainsong creating a dreamlike experience.

Approaching the Cathedral from the High Street Gate, a neon installation entitled I Will Turn Darkness Into Light, inspired by scripture and installed above the North Porch Gates, will welcome visitors with its simple promise of hope.

On the Cloister Garth, Lumen by David Ogle RBS, will sit among the grand Cedars that were planted to commemorate Queen Victoria’s ascension to the throne. This installation of 5 tree-like structures will form a luminous canopy of interlocking neon branches up to 3 metres high which will bathe the stone arches with a vibrant glow.

Suspended inside the Cathedral you will find The Light, a 4-metre illuminated globe created by Richard McLester and his Poole-based studio team, which projects a galaxy of stars that whirl and spin around it until finally focusing on the ‘Star of Bethlehem’, the symbol of Christ’s birth.   Join us for an evening of immersive music at the Songs of the Light Concert.  Please see here for more information.

Visit the Salisbury Cathedral website for full details

TOUR OPTIONS:

Day tours from London visiting Salisbury 

Stonehenge Winter Solstice and Salisbury Christmas Market Tour from London

Private guided sightseeing tours of Salisbury and Stonehenge

Visit Wiltshire Website

The Stonehenge Travel and Tour Company
Stonehenge and Salisbury Guided Tours
The Local Experts

 

Magna Carta is seen as a major step in the history of human rights. #Humanrightsday

What is Human Rights Day?
Human Rights Day is observed every year on 10th December. It commemorates the day (10 December 1948) the United Nations General Assembly adopted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

Magna Carta is famous as a symbol of justice, fairness, and human rights. For centuries it has inspired and encouraged movements for freedom and constitutional government in Britain and around the world. But when it was issued by England’s King John in June 1215 it was an attempt to prevent a civil war between the king and his powerful barons…

magna-carta

Magna Carta (Latin for “Great Charter”) is one of the most celebrated documents in English history. At the time it was the solution to a political crisis in Medieval England but its importance has endured as it has become recognised as a cornerstone of liberty influencing much of the civilized world

Salisbury Cathedral is extremely proud to be home to the finest of the four surviving original 1215 Magna Carta. Their Magna Carta is on permanent display to visitors in the newly-conserved Chapter House.

Only four copies of Magna Carta dating from 1215 have survived the ravages of time and Salisbury Cathedral is proud to be home to the best preserved original manuscript. Elias of Dereham, priest and steward of the archbishop of Canterbury is thought to have brought Salisbury’s copy of to Old Sarum in the days following the events at Runnymede and it has remained in the Cathedral’s care ever since

The Salisbury Connection

At Runnymede King John was urged to accept the demands of the barons and agree Magna Carta by his half-brother, William Longspeé, whose Effigy is in Salisbury Cathedral. Also present at Runnymede was Elias of Dereham, who at the time was steward to one of the key players in the crisis, the Archbishop of Canterbury Stephen Langton. Elias himself was a skilled negotiator and was at the very centre of the discussions between the King and the barons. Once Magna Carta was agreed and sealed he was entrusted with delivering ten of the thirteen copies made, one of which was given to the original cathedral at Old Sarum. Elias later became a Canon of Old Sarum before masterminding the building of the present Salisbury Cathedral.

Join us on a private guided tour of Salisbury Catheral and see Magna Carta or join a guided coach tour from London

The excellent Visit Wiltshire website will help you plan your trip to Salisbury and Wiltshire.

The Stonehenge and Salisbury Guided Tours Experts
http://www.StonehengeTravel.co.uk

10 Top-Rated Tourist Attractions in Salisbury, Wiltshire

Historically a centre of the cloth industry, Salisbury – the county town of Wiltshire – is situated at the point where the Rivers Nadder and Bourne flow into the River Avon. The city is famous for its cathedral, a masterpiece of the early Gothic style that dates to 1220 when the building’s foundation stone was laid.

A checkerboard layout, with enclosed gardens between the houses, was a model for medieval town planning. On receiving market privileges from the king, a bridge was built across the Avon in 1244, thereby creating perfect conditions for Salisbury to become a major trading center.

1 Salisbury Cathedral

Salisbury Cathedral
Salisbury Cathedral

Salisbury Cathedral was built in a relatively short time – from 1220 to 1266 – in a typically English style consisting of a nave, long choir, retrochoir, main west transept and east choir transept (shielded from the choir by false arches). The interior of the cathedral, which is of bright-colored limestone and darkly gleaming Purbeck marble, displays the horizontal sequencing of the trusses, strengthened by continuous ledges. The construction of the walls is divided into three zones, with arches, a gallery-like triforium and a passageway above. A ribbed vault in four parts encloses the nave at a height of only 82 ft. The interior fittings of the cathedral, considerably altered in the 18th century, include elaborate tombstones dating back to the 13th century.

Although there are a few medieval fragments, the stained glass – primarily 19th and 20th centuries – is exquisite, particularly the Gabriel Loire window in the Lady Chapel. The Gothic cloister and the octagonal chapterhouse both date from the 14th century, the latter having a single central pillar acting as a vault support, a fine wall-frieze with pictures from the Old Testament and tracery windows divided into four sections with 19th century glass. Items stored there include one of the four original copies of the Magna Carta, the foundation of the British constitution, as well as other Anglo Saxon documents and the inspection report on the cathedral tower written by Sir Christopher Wren in 1668.

Address: Chapter Office, 6 The Close, Salisbury

Accommodation: Where to Stay in Salisbury – TripAdvisor.com

2 Cathedral Close

Cathedral Close
Cathedral Close

Within Salisbury Cathedral Close and separated from the rest of the town by three gateways, a number of notable Elizabethan and Georgian houses have lovely green lawns and date from the 14th to 18th centuries. These were the residences of the dean, ecclesiastical officers and teachers at the cathedral school. Of special interest is Mompesson House, with its elegant interior fittings and wonderful collection of glass. Another nearby home worthy of a visit is Arundells, residence of former Prime Minister Sir Edward Heath.

Address: The King’s House, 65 The Close, Salisbury

3 Old City Centre

Old City Center
Old City Centre

The old city center includes the 15th century parish church of St Thomas of Canterbury as well as the wide market place with its 15th century market cross, the Guildhall (1788) and the 15th century Plume of Feathers Inn. Nearby is the Red Lion Hotel with its fine 1820s facade and pretty inner courtyard, and Joiner’s Hall, an attractive half-timbered building dating from the 16th century.

Through the North Gate are the meadows of the River Avon with their fine views of the cathedral. John Constable captured these on canvas in his famous painting of 1820.

Address: Pennyfarthing House, 18 Pennyfarthing St, Salisbury

4 Old Sarum

Old Sarum
Old Sarum

Old Sarum was the precursor of present-day Salisbury, built two miles to the north of the city center on a hill, which even in prehistoric times was fortified. The Romans built the camp of Sorviodonum here, while under the Saxons a town settlement grew up on the site. William the Conqueror chose this strategically favorable spot to build a castle in 1075, and in 1220 the inhabitants of Old Sarum were moved to New Salisbury. Today, only a few remains of the castle within the inner circumference wall can be seen, and the cathedral ruins within the outer wall.

Location: Castle Rd, Salisbury

5 Salisbury and South Wiltshire Museum

Salisbury and South Wiltshire Museum
Salisbury and South Wiltshire Museum Graham Tiller

The Salisbury and South Wiltshire Museum has permanent displays and special exhibitions throughout the year that highlight the art and history of England and the Salisbury area. This is one of the most fascinating areas in Britain, rich in mediaeval history and home to the World Heritage Site of Stonehenge. The award-winning museum is home to the Stonehenge Gallery, Monkton Deverill Gold Torc, as well as unique costume, glass and chinaware collections.

Address: 58 The Close, Salisbury

6 Larmer Tree Gardens

Larmer Tree Gardens
Larmer Tree Gardens

The Larmer Tree Gardens, set in the ancient forest known as Cranborne Chase, were established by general Pitt Rivers in 1880 as pleasure grounds for “public enlightenment and entertainment” and were the first privately owned gardens to be opened for public enjoyment. You’ll find Indian buildings, a Roman Temple and an open-air theatre amidst acres of gardens inhabited by pheasants, peacocks and other exotic birds.

Location: Rushmore Estate Office, Tollard Royal, Salisbury

7 Salisbury Festival

Salisbury Festival takes place in spring with a different theme each year, and includes orchestral, choral and chamber concerts, recitals, film screenings and lectures. Numerous venues are used, including St Thomas Hall, the cathedral and other historical buildings.

Another important event is the Southern Cathedrals Festival, an annual festival that rotates every year between the cities of Winchester, Salisbury and Chichester. The festival takes place mid-July and includes daily concerts and a program featuring a mix of orchestral, choral and chamber concerts, recitals and fringe events. The repertoire is equally varied and includes classical and sacred music as well as newly commissioned works performed in the host city’s cathedral. Another great event, The Salisbury Arts Festival, runs for two weeks each May and features dance, music, street performances and art exhibitions.

Address: 144 East Main St, Salisbury

8 The Rifles (Berkshire and Wiltshire) Museum

The Rifles (Berkshire and Wiltshire) Museum
The Rifles (Berkshire and Wiltshire) Museum Tony Hisgett

The Wardrobe is an elegant building housing The Rifles (Berkshire and Wiltshire) Museum, an award-winning museum detailing the history of English County Regiments. The building dates to 1254 and contains exhibits on the Royal Berkshire and Wiltshire Regiments.

From the gardens you can stroll down to the River Avon with its views of the Water Meadows. Another military museum to visit is the award-winning Museum of the Duke of Edinburgh’s Royal Regiment.

Address: 58 The Close, Salisbury

9 Cholderton Charlies Rare Breeds Farm

Cholderton Charlies Rare Breeds Farm has breeds dating back hundreds of years, reflecting an animal heritage as interesting as its buildings and monuments. In addition to the many animals is a nature trail, water gardens, a picnic area and adventure playground for children. Also popular are the many opportunities to feed piglets and other young animals.

Location: Amesbury Road, Cholderton, Salisbury

10 Malmesbury House

Malmesbury House
Malmesbury House Beth Camp

Malmesbury House is located on The Close near Salisbury Cathedral where many of the city’s historical attractions are found. The house has seen many faces, both architecturally and in its visitors, and was originally a canonry in the 13th century before being enlarged.

The west facade was added decades later to accommodate rooms displaying magnificent rococo plasterwork, and notable visitors included King Charles II and the composer Handel. (Although privately owned, tours are occasionally permitted.)

Location: The Close, Salisbury

Surroundings

Wilton House

Wilton House
Wilton House David Spender

Built by architect Inigo Jones in 1653 after the original Tudor home was destroyed by fire, Wilton House is a masterpiece of the Baroque style and most notable for its huge white Double Cube Room. Decorated with gold-painted flowers and garlands of fruit and rounded off with a brilliantly colorful painted ceiling, the room is also fascinating for its portraits by van Dyck, as well as portraits of Charles I, Queen Henrietta Maria and their three children. Equally impressive is the Single Cube Room, its painted ceiling having scenes from Sir Philip Sidney’s Arcadia, written in 1590 while a guest at Wilton House, as well as paintings by Rembrandt, Rubens and Reynolds. The landscaped park surrounding the house harbors a magnificent stock of old trees. Another unusual feature is the Palladian bridge (1737) over the River Nadder.

Be sure to visit the picturesque Village of Wilton, the old capital of the Saxon kingdom of Wessex, and later of Wiltshire. It is famous for its carpets, plus home to antique shops and a weekly market.

Location: The Estate Office, Wiilton, Salisbury

Official site: www.wiltonhouse.co.uk

Shaftesbury

Shaftesbury
Shaftesbury

Located 19 miles southwest of Salisbury, Shaftesbury is a picturesque little market town famous for its ruined Benedictine abbey. Only the foundation walls remain as a reminder of the abbey’s existence, while in the Shaftesbury Abbey and Garden there’s a model of the building as it once was as well as finds from the Middle Ages.

Shaftesbury is also a notable tourist destination due to the steep cobbled streets of Gold Hill, picturesquely lined on one side with tiny houses dating from the 16th to 18th centuries, while on the other side there’s a 13th century ochre-colored wall. Visitors enjoy superb views across the Blackmoor Vale to Somerset.

St Peter’s Church is the only one of the 12 medieval churches that’s been preserved, and possesses an interesting crypt and a fine doorway. Also of note, the Shaftesbury Gold Hill Museum has many exhibits detailing local history.

Location: Gold Hill, Shaftesbury

Stourhead

Stourhead
Stourhead

Stourhead, 26 miles west of Salisbury, is one of the finest landscaped gardens of the 18th century and unchanged since its inception. The unique design of the garden includes an artificial lake with caves, classical temples and landing stages surrounded by hills planted with trees. The park and the stately Palladian mansion were designed in 1721, with elegant period furniture provided by Chippendale, while the gallery contains paintings by Canaletto, Raphael, Nicolas Poussin and Angelika Kaufmann. King Alfred’s Tower, erected to commemorate the Saxon king, towers over the surrounding parkland and affords fine panoramic views.

Location: Mere, Wiltshire

Old Wardour Castle

Old Wardour Castle
Old Wardour Castle Mats Hagwall

Old Wardour Castle, near Tisbury, is a 14th century structure on the edge of a beautiful lake. A battle was fought here in 1643 when Parliamentarian forces besieged the castle causing extensive damage. More recently, Robin Hood Prince Of Thieves starring Kevin Costner was filmed here. The castle’s unusual hexagonal ruins are surrounded by landscaped grounds, and are a picturesque location for picnics or a relaxing day out.

Location: Tisbury, Salisbury

This excellent article was written by Bryan Dearsley of Planetware

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Best-preserved Magna Carta goes on show at Salisbury Cathedral for Magna Carta 800

Salisbury Cathedral – home to the finest preserved of the four original copies of Magna Carta – celebrates the 800th anniversary of its signing

a photo of bottles and quills on a table inside a cathedral

Quills and ink at the ready as Salisbury Cathedral prepares to reveal the Magna Carta© Ash Mills

Salisbury Cathedral’s Magna Carta is the finest preserved of the four original copies and it is celebrating the 800th anniversary of its signing by King John at Runnymede with a fitting new display that promises to explore both its history and its relevance today.

Promising a “thrilling experience” that will take visitors on a journey of liberty and justice through the Cathedral, its medieval cloisters and the stunning 13th century Chapter House, the centrepiece will be the original Magna Carta housed in a new display.

The immersive exhibition, called Magna Carta: Spirit of Justice, Power of Words, is designed to bring to life the history and the contemporary relevance of this extraordinary document, which is often seen as representing the foundation of modern human rights and the justice system we recognise today.

Tactile hands-on activities will include a medieval sword, quill pens and a parchment that visitors can try out to get a feel of medieval life, while touch screen displays will allow people to explore the continued fight for justice and human rights in the 21st century.

// Best-preserved Magna Carta goes on show at Salisbury Cathedral for Magna Carta 800 | Culture24// // // // // // // // //

“So many of the liberties that we hold dear today – and perhaps sometimes take for granted – can be traced back to Magna Carta,” said The Dean of Salisbury, the Very Revd June Osborne.

“Despite its age the document has clearly gained in relevance for a modern audience, and there is a tangible sense of anticipation as we open this new exhibition and launch the 800th anniversary celebrations in Salisbury.”

Re-housed in a dramatic new enclosure, the cathedral’s copy of Magna Carta is joined by manuscript treasures from the archive together with a new interpretation of the ornate medieval frieze, which visitors can follow round the Chapter House.

More is revealed about the historical characters linked to Salisbury who shaped the creation and early years of Magna Carta, while contemporary reflections on the meaning of Magna Carta are provided through an thought-provoking documentary made in partnership with local students and Bournemouth University.

With the accent firmly on encouraging a response, the exhibition has been designed to appeal to families and younger audiences as well as the Cathedral’s many international visitors, using media installations, simple interactives, objects and stylish graphics.

“I know that the many visitors who will come to Salisbury Cathedral to experience this exhibition will be excited and engaged by what they find,” added the Very Rvd Osborne. “I hope they will go away inspired by Magna Carta’s enduring values of fairness, universal rights and justice.”

A wide-ranging programme of supporting events has been arranged by the Cathedral during 2015.

Link source: http://www.culture24.org.uk/history-and-heritage/art519103-the-best-preserved-magna-carta-goes-on-show-at-salisbury-cathedral-for-magna-carta-800

Click here for Salisbury Guided Tours

  • You can see Magna Carta: Spirit of Justice, Power of Words from February 28 2015.

Stonehenge and Salisbury Guided Tours
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Magna Carta and beyond: stepping back in time in Salisbury

In 2015, Salisbury will celebrate Magna Carta’s 800th anniversary in what promises to be a banner year for the city. This ancient document is one of many treasures in this charming English city, from prehistoric stone circles through to medieval pubs and stately homes. Exploring Salisbury allows you to unravel 5000 years of history. These six experiences are guaranteed to spirit you back in time.

Celebrate Magna Carta, a milestone for human freedom

Salisbury is packed with history. Image by Barry Winiker / Getty Salisbury is packed with history. Image by Barry Winiker / Getty

The ‘Great Charter’ is lauded worldwide as a symbol of freedom and justice – quite astonishing for an 800-year-old document concerning the rights of English noblemen. Sealed on the banks of the Thames in 1215, the Magna Carta curbed the powers of the English throne, gave land-owning rights to noblemen and laid down the right to a fair trial. Barons enjoyed the benefit of these new laws, while peasants remained as downtrodden as ever. But despite this, the Magna Carta has become a global inspiration, in particular the oft-quoted words, ‘No free man shall be seized or imprisoned, or stripped of his rights or possessions, or outlawed or exiled’. It has been credited as a predecessor to the United States Constitution and the Bill of Rights.

True enthusiasts are waiting to hear if they will be part of the lucky few to see all four copies at a one-off exhibition in London’s British Library (decided by ballot). But Salisbury’s copy – the best preserved of the four – continues to be part of a grand display in Salisbury Cathedral’s Chapter House, and will be the focus of a calendar of celebrations, talks and choral music during 2015.

One of the pleasures of visiting Salisbury’s Magna Carta is the enthusiasm of the volunteer guides. Check visiting hours on salisburycathedral.org.uk – avoid 3 February 2015, when Magna Carta will be on tour in London.

Climb the spire of a medieval masterpiece

Salisbury Cathedral boasts the tallest spire in Britain. Image by Michael Day / CC BY 2.0 Salisbury Cathedral boasts the tallest spire in Britain. Image by Michael Day / CC BY 2.0

There’s much more than Magna Carta to admire at Salisbury Cathedral. This grandiose construction boasts England’s largest cloisters and cathedral close, and harbours a rather singular curio, the world’s oldest working clock (dating to 1386). Most significantly, Salisbury Cathedral boasts the tallest church spire in the United Kingdom (a cloud-piercing 123m high). Those with a head for heights – and a stomach for narrow spiral staircases – mustn’t miss a guided tour of the tower for views over the rolling hills of Wiltshire.

Detail from Salisbury Cathedral. Image by Anita Isalska / Lonely Planet
Detail from Salisbury Cathedral. Image by Anita Isalska / Lonely Planet

Visitors with a taste for the days of lordly squabbles and tight-bodiced dames will find other traces of medieval Salisbury throughout the city. It’s impossible to miss the elaborate stone Poultry Cross in the market square, and look out for the coat of arms on the North Gate.

Salisbury Cathedral is open daily. Tours of the tower take 90 minutes and allow limited numbers, so book a slot early on salisburycathedral.org.uk.

Visitors with a taste for the days of lordly squabbles and tight-bodiced dames will find other traces of medieval Salisbury throughout the city. It’s impossible to miss the elaborate stone Poultry Cross in the market square, and look out for the coat of arms on the North Gate.

Salisbury Cathedral is open daily. Tours of the tower take 90 minutes and allow limited numbers, so book a slot early on salisburycathedral.org.uk.

Explore the silent city of Old Sarum

For an alternative view of Salisbury Cathedral, step out on the ramparts of Old Sarum. This Iron Age hill fort, slightly north of the city centre, holds the key to Salisbury’s early history. Old Sarum was established in 3000BC, and for centuries was a castle stronghold with a thriving community. Old Sarum’s significance as a military outpost ended abruptly in the 13th century when its bishop was given permission to build a new cathedral in what is now modern Salisbury. People fled Old Sarum to seek their fortunes in the new city, while Old Sarum’s cathedral was gutted and torn down. The result is a site frozen in time: the old cathedral is a ghostly outline, and the windswept ramparts jealously overlook Salisbury.

Roaming this exposed site is best reserved for a sunny day. Old Sarum is a 10-minute drive (or short bus ride on the 8 or X5) from Salisbury city centre. Plan your visit on english-heritage.org.uk

Hail the solstice at Wiltshire’s stone circles

Few sights inspire such a mixture of bewilderment and awe as Stonehenge, the world-famous circle of boulders on Salisbury’s outskirts. Now known to have been transported by labourers from southwest Wales (250km from the site) and assembled around 2400BC, the motivation for this incredible feat remains obscure. Historians’ best guess is that it was an ancient burial site and then a monument to celebrate the winter solstice (pagan worshippers gather at the site to this day). Considering the various theories about Stonehenge is part of the fun, so allow time for the recently upgraded visitors’ centre at the site.Avebury Stones. Image by Gordon Robertson / CC BY 2.0 Avebury Stones. Image by Gordon Robertson / CC BY 2.0

These millennia-old monoliths certainly draw the crowds, but further north lies a site vaster and more ancient than Stonehenge. The Avebury Stones stretch back even further (to an estimated 2850BC) and form Europe’s largest stone circle. The three rings making up this Neolithic monument are thought to have been the focus of rituals warding off nature’s crueller whims. Today, a chapel and a pub, the Red Lion Inn, are encircled by these ancient stones.

Visit Stonehenge and Avebury as a combined day-trip from Salisbury. Stonehenge is a 20-minute drive north of Salisbury, and Avebury another 35 minutes by car from there. Tours from London are also available.

Swoon at 18th-century stately homes

Want to explore a more genteel era? Salisbury boasts an array of period buildings from the 18th and 19th centuries, and the jewel in the crown is Mompesson House. With its stone exterior, iron gates and tranquil walled gardens, Mompesson House is so unabashedly English that it was chosen as a filming location for the 1995 movie Sense and Sensibility.

Exploring the interior is evocative of Georgian England – you can almost detect a whiff of smelling salts. You’ll sidle past delicate plasterwork and period furniture, glance at 18th-century goblets and mother-of-pearl jewellery boxes… anyone else need their corset loosening?

Mompesson House rewards eco-friendly travellers: mention that you arrived by bike or public transport and enjoy a discount in their tea room. Plan your visit at nationaltrust.org.uk.

Quaff ales like a medieval peasantiThe Cloisters, Salisbury. Image by Charles DP Miller / CC BY 2.0 The Cloisters has open fires and Sunday roasts. Image by Charles D P Miller / CC BY 2.0

Time travel is thirsty work. Luckily Salisbury’s pubs have rich enough folklore to keep the history flowing along with the ale. Start at the Haunch of Venison: not only does this pub, dating to 1320, conceal secret passageways (supposedly wending their way to the cathedral), it’s also the site of a mischievous ghost. Another 14th-century drinking haunt is Grade II-listed The Cloisters (cloisterspubsalisbury.co.uk), a winter favourite for its open fires and Sunday roasts. Finally, the Ox Row Inn (theoxrowinn.co.uk) is a relative youngster, pouring brews since the 16th century. Some of the old-world charm has been polished out of it during recent makeovers, but its black and white timbered exterior and ale selection make it a fine stop on a historic pub crawl.

Want to go right to the source? Book a visit to a’Beckett’s Vineyard (abecketts.co.uk) or Wadworth Brewery (wadworthvisitorcentre.co.uk). 

Make it happen

Salisbury is an easy day-trip by train from London (1½ hours) or Bristol (from 1 hour 10 minutes) but you’ll need your own wheels if you want to explore the Wiltshire countryside. Basing yourself in Salisbury for a couple of days allows plenty of time to explore the sights and make the most of pubs and local eats. Sticky your fingers over cream tea at Howard’s House (howardshousehotel.co.uk), splurge on confit duck at local favourite Charter 1227 (charter1227.co.uk) or go for sophisticated contemporary Indian at Anokaa. If you want sumptuous lodgings in the city centre, choose St Ann’s House or Milford Hall. For rustic atmosphere and river views, go with the Legacy Rose & Crown Hotel.

Full article in the excellent Lonely Planet Guide Book: http://www.lonelyplanet.com/europe/travel-tips-and-articles/magna-carta-and-beyond-stepping-back-in-time-in-salisbury

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Construction of new Magna Carta Exhibition underway at Salisbury Cathedral

As Salisbury Cathedral prepares for a bonanza year of events to celebrate Magna Carta’s 800th anniversary, work has begun on our new Chapter House exhibition.

Exhibition%20visuals

“It’s very exciting that 2015 and the Anniversary Year is finally here – and to see work actually starting. The new Magna Carta exhibition will see the Chapter House and Cloisters transformed into an interactive space that will set the document in its historic context. It will be an immersive visitor experience with digital media displays, artefacts, interactive stations and video to bring the story of King John and his barons to life and prompt us to reflect on what the Magna Carta really stands for” said David Coulthard, Marketing and Communications Director.

Alongside Magna Carta, other rare medieval documents from the Cathedral’s archive will be put on show, in addition to a selection of objects loaned by Salisbury Museum.Salisbury-Blue-Ribbon

During the construction work Salisbury Cathedral’s original 1215 Magna Carta will not be on public display and the Chapter House will be closed. However a near perfect facsimile of Magna Carta will be displayed in the Morning Chapel on the North side of the Cathedral.

Whilst off display the 800 year old document will undergo conservation work in preparation for the British Library and House of Lords unification events on 2- 4 February, when all four of the surviving original 1215 copies of Magna Carta will be brought together for the first time. When returned to Salisbury Cathedral, Magna Carta will be installed in the new exhibition, which will open in March 2015.

View images of the dismantling of the old Magna Carta display here.
Posted By : Megan Bullock @ Salisbury Cathedral

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Discover the historic gems on our doorstep

YOU can travel back in time on this holiday and trace thousands of years of British history, from Stonehenge up to the signing of the Magna Carta.

Visit Salisbury Cathedral, is unique among English medieval cathedrals having been built in a single architectural style - early English gothic.

Visit Salisbury Cathedral, is unique among English medieval cathedrals having been built in a single architectural style – early English gothic.

From the famous standing stones through to the celebrated document inspired by King John and the Georgian streets of Bath, this is a trip that will no doubt fascinate and delight.

After boarding the private coach in the early morning you will travel towards your hotel, visiting the quant villages of Castle Combe and Laycock along the way.

Both have featured in major films and TV series, Castle Combe in Stephen Spielberg’s War Horse and Lacock was used in some scenes for the Harry Potter films. Lacock also featured in the popular TV programme The Cranford Chronicles.

After dinner and a chance to relax in the hotel, day two will be all about Stonehenge, where you’ll head after breakfast.

The first stop of the day is the famous standing stones and its long-awaited and now open exhibition and visitor centre.

The exhibition contains nearly 300 archaelogical treasures found in the area, and also valuable insights into how and why the stone circle was built, and the people responsible.

The monument itself is a little over a mile from the centre, so you will have the choice of walking to it with a complementary audio guide or using the shuttle for the ride to the stones.

After seeing the stones, you will then travel to Salisbury Cathedral, which is unique among English medieval cathedrals having been built in a single architectural style – early English gothic.

The Chapter House here is home to the finest of only four surviving Magna Carta, the first formal document of its kind that paved the way for democracy. An exhibition explaints how it came about, and what its significance is even today.

On day three you will head to Bath and enjoy a full day at leisure in this fine city, which boasts its famous Roman baths, the Royal Crescent and beautiful Pulteney Bridge.

After breakfast the following day you will enjoy a brief tour of the Cotswolds, including the charming village of Malmesbury, before heading home.

Full Article in the excellent Bristol Post: http://www.bristolpost.co.uk/Discover-historic-gems-doorstep/story-25845069-detail/story.html#ixzz3OmEXVcC8

We operate guided tours including Stonehenge, Salisbury, Lacock, Castle Combe, Bath and the Cotswolds

Stonehenge Travel Co.
Mystical Landscape, Magical Tours
http://www.StonehengeTravel.co.uk

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