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DISCOVER THE GREAT WEST WAY: PRIVATE GUIDED TOURS / TRANSFERS 2019

The Great West Way is a new sightseeing route, stretching between London and Bristol. It follows a 125 mile route based on the one of the first Great Roads commissioned by the Kings of England.

Get off the beaten track to discover the towns and villages that make up this diverse meandering path through southern England.

It’s for slow travellers just as interested in the journey, and the colourful characters encountered along the way. And the big adventures that lead to unexpected diversions. The long-awaited pilgrimage to Stonehenge, perhaps, that leads to the secret stones of Avebury and 4,000 years of history you never knew existed. It’s about saying yes to new experiences and delighting in smaller, simple, special things – as well as the superlatives

The Great West Way Touring Route

5 reasons to visit the new Great West Way from London to Bristol
The Great English Countryside
The stately homes (and impressive castles)
The vibrant and varied culture
Cosy pubs
The picture-perfect villages

We offer private customised guided tours / transfers departing from London, Salisbury, Bath and Bristol following the Great West Way. These are ideal for individuals, families and small groups visiting the area. Our custom guided tours can be full day, overnight or even 3 – 5 day tours. We have many years experience and would be delighted to assist with your travel plans. Drop us an email with group size, anticipated travel dates and we wll send some options and prices.

Great West Road Links:
Visit Britain
DISCOVER THE GREAT WEST WAY
Visit Wiltshire
Wanderlust

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Stonehenge and Salisbury Guided Tours
The Local Experts

Stonehenge in its Prehistoric World : New Stonehenge display reveals ancient tensions

The exhibition explores Britain’s roller coaster relationship with Europe.

An exhibition called Making Connections: Stonehenge in its Prehistoric World opens today (Friday 12th October).

Objects from the exhibition

Objects from the Stonehenge exhibition

It showcases among some of the most prized objects in the British Museums’ collection of ancient Britain and Europe.

English Heritage and the British Museum have come together to stage the exhibition which examines the shifting relationship between the British Isles and mainland Europe during the Neolithic and Bronze Ages.

Among some of the artifacts on display include three chalk cylinders from around 3000BC found with the burial of a child in North Yorkshire, a gold neckpiece made around 4000 years ago, and a 6,500 year old jade axe.

Making Connections: Stonehenge in its Prehistoric World opens on 12 October and runs until 21st April 2019.

It’s among a number of events English Heritage is holding to mark 100 years since local couple Cecil and Mary Chubb gifted the monument to the nation.

Published by The Spire FM News Team at 5:30am 12th October 2018.  Source

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How the current heatwave is providing unprecedented opportunities for archaeologists

Gold-rush style excitement as researchers scramble into aircraft and fly drones to find the outlines of previously hidden remains before the rain makes them disappear again.

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Newly discovered crop marks showing the outline of a prehistoric or Roman farm near Langstone, Newport, south Wales (RCAHMW/SWNS)

The current heatwave is providing a near-unprecedented bonanza for archaeologists, as scorched conditions all over Britain expose the previously undiscovered or long-hidden outlines of everything from ancient fortifications to remnants of the Second World War.

In what was described as “a frantic race against time and weather”, archaeologists are scrambling into aeroplanes or flying drones to search for the outlines which are visible from the air as “crop marks”, before they are once more erased by rain.

In Wales alone the new discoveries have included an early medieval cemetery in south Gwynedd, a Roman villa in the Vale of Glamorgan, a prehistoric or Roman farm near Newport and a Roman fortlet near Magor, south Wales.

Members of the public are spotting the signs of everything from Bronze Age burial grounds in their local park to long-forgotten Second World War air raid shelters in back gardens and schools.

And for the professionals, something akin to archaeological gold-rush fever has set in.

“It’s hugely exciting,” said Louise Barker, a senior archaeological investigator at the Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Wales (RCAHMW). “There have been whole new discoveries, covering all periods of time.

“Our senior aerial investigator Dr Toby Driver is flying all over Wales, going over landscapes and saying, ‘Oh my goodness, there is something I never expected down there.’ He says so much new archaeology is showing it is incredible.

“There probably hasn’t been anything like this for more than 40 years. It is pretty spectacular.”

Source: The Independent

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2018 Stonehenge Private Access Inner Circle Tours from Salisbury with the Local Experts

EXCLUSIVE STONEHENGE INNER CIRCLE PRIVATE ACCESS TOURS

This is a rare opportunity to visit one of the most popular and mystifing Prehistoric sites in the world. Our Stonehenge private access tours are either early morning (sunrise) or evening (sunset) event.  We will be able to walk amongst the stones and stand within the stone circle!

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Stonehenge Special Access Sunrise Tour

“We believe that your guided tour should be truly unforgettable, so we don’t take any chances. The expert knowledge of all our specialists allows us to select the best possible transport, guides and excursions to suit your tastes and budget..”

IMPORTANT STONEHENGE ACCESS INFORMATION:
Normal viewing only permits access from the path that surrounds the circle. Stonehenge dates from 3100BC, and you will be walking where very few people have access. Your expert guide will explain some of the theories behind this amazing feat of Prehistoric construction.

Our Stonehenge Special Access visits are available most but not all months of the year, (no visits in October and November and are not available on and around the midsummer’s day). Evening Special Access is only available in the summer months.

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Stonehenge special access inner circle tour

STONEHENGE AND SALSBURY GUIDED TOURS
We offer a wide variety of ways of getting to Stonehenge from Salisbury or even Bath, Southampton and London. Which is best for you will depend upon how much time you have and which other places you would like to combine with your visit. Typical itineraries include Salisbury Cathedral, Woodhenge, Durrington Walls, The Cursus, Avebury Stone Circle, West Kennet Long Barrow, Silbury Hill, Glastonbury Tor and Abbey.

We can even arrage for our guides to meet you at the monument itself for exclusive inner circle tours and the greater landscape,

“Stonehenge was awarded World Heritage status for both ancient culture and its natural attributes, and it is worthwhile for anyone visiting the ladscape to look beyond the monument and learn something of its significance.”

Don’t take a chance on your ‘once in a lifetime’ opportunity to visit one of the most important pre-historic monuments in the World. The approved Stonehenge Travel Company are considered as the local Stonehenge experts and a trusted brand in Stonehenge tours for overseas visitors to England. We employ the very best tourist guides who know and will share so much more than just the basic facts!

Demand for English Heritage special access tickets far exceeds supply, dates are often sold out many months in advance. Do not expect to get tickets without ordering well in advance. Visit our website for more details.

Stonehenge and Salisbury Guided Tours
The Local Experts!
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Prehistoric Burials and Artifacts Unearthed in Wiltshire

LARKHILL GARRISON, ENGLAND—Prehistoric burials were uncovered duringEngland-Larkhill-Garrison construction work at a military base located about a mile and a half from Stonehenge, according to a report in Salisbury Journal. One of the burials contained the remains of an infant who had been placed in a grave dug in an existing ditch. “Prehistoric pottery was found in the ditch fill which sealed the grave, which suggests the burial was also prehistoric,” said archaeologist Ruth Panes of Wessex Archaeology. A second body was identified as a male aged between 15 and 17 at the time of death. A third had been buried in a crouched position, probably sometime between 2400 and 1600 B.C. Postholes from a roundhouse measuring about 14 feet in diameter were also revealed, as well as prehistoric pits and ditches, and worked flint. The excavators said they think the area under investigation was once a woodland, since they have uncovered a large number of hollows formed by fallen or removed trees. More recent features include five zig-zag-shaped air-raid trenches, and the foundations of three military buildings that probably date to World War II. For more, go to “Quarrying Stonehenge.”

Read the full article (source) on the Archaeology Website

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‘Exciting’ Bronze Age cremation site is unearthed near Stonehenge…by a BADGER: Human remains and 4,000-year-old artefacts found near the animal’s sett

  • A badger dug up an urn from burial mound on Netheravon Down, Wiltshire
  • Archaeologists then conducted an excavation of the 4,000-year-old site 
  • Cremated human remains and tools dating back to 2,200BC were found
  • Wrist guards and tools suggest the grave may have belonged to an archer

The Stonehenge site has been scoured by archaeologists for decades as they attempt to learn more about the history of the land around Britain’s famous ancient monument.

But the latest discovery at the site has been excavated by a rather unlikely source – a badger.

copper-chiesel

A copper chisel (pictured) with a decorated bone handle was discovered at the burial site during the excavation by injured military personnel and veterans working as part of Operation Nightingale

A Bronze Age cremation site was found after badgers dug into an ancient burial mound on land belonging to the Ministry of Defence at Netheravon in Wiltshire.

Artefacts including Bronze Age tools, a flint knife, pottery and an archer’s wrist guard, dating back to between 2,200BC and 2,000BC, were discovered alongside cremated human remains at a site that sits just 5 miles (8km) from the monument.

Archaeologists spotted the site after a badger unearthed a cremation urn and left shards of pottery lying on the ground around the burial mound.

Richard Osgood, senior archaeologist at the MoD’s Defence Infrastructure Organisation, led an excavation of the site and described it as an ‘exciting find’.

Experts have said the discovery may be of similar significance to the famous Amesbury Archer, which was found in 2002.

Please read the full story and see images of exactly what was found.

We operate achaelogical day tours from London and Salisbury.  Our Stonehege day trps from Salisbury explore the wide landscape surrounding Stonehenge.

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Powerful Women Buried at Stonehenge Stone Circle

The remains of 14 women believed to be of high status and importance have been found at Stonehenge, the iconic prehistoric monument in Wiltshire, England.

Stonehenge inner circel tours sunrise

The discovery, along with other finds, supports the theory that Stonehenge functioned, at least for part of its long history, as a cremation cemetery for leaders and other noteworthy individuals, according to a report published in the latest issue of British Archaeology.

During the recent excavation, more women than men were found buried at Stonehenge, a fact that could change its present image.

Photos: ‘Superhenge’ Found Buried Near Stonehenge

In almost every depiction of Stonehenge by artists and TV re-enactors we see lots of men, a man in charge, and few or no women,” archaeologist Mike Pitts, who is the editor of British Archaeology and the author of the book “Hengeworld,” told Discovery News.

“The archaeology now shows that as far as the burials go, women were as prominent there as men. This contrasts with the earlier burial mounds, where men seem to be more prominent.”

Pitts added, “By definition — cemeteries are rare, Stonehenge exceptional — anyone buried at Stonehenge is likely to have been special in some way: high status families, possessors of special skills or knowledge, ritual or political leaders.”

Understanding Stonehenge: Two Explanations

The recent excavation focused on what is known as Aubrey Hole 7, one of 56 chalk pits dug just outside of the stone circle and dating to the earliest phases of Stonehenge in the late fourth and early third millennium B.C.

Christie Willis of the University College London Institute of Archaeology worked on the project and confirmed that the remains of at least 14 females and nine males — all young adults or older — were found at the site. A barrage of high tech analysis techniques, such as CT scanning, was needed to study the remains, given that the individuals had been cremated.

Radiocarbon dating and other analysis of all known burials at Stonehenge reveal that they took place in several episodes from about 3100 B.C. to at least 2140 B.C. Long bone pins, thought to be hair pins, as well as a mace head made out of gneiss — a striped stone associated with transformation — have also been excavated at Stonehenge.

Stonehenge Was Once A Complete Circle

As for why no children’s remains were found during this latest excavation, both Willis and Pitts believe that such corpses must have been treated differently. Pitts suspects that infants and children were also cremated, but that their ashes were scattered in the nearby river Avon.

“There is a common association between late Neolithic religious centers and the sources or upper reaches of significant rivers,” he explained.

Stonehenge’s location is also important because prior U.K. burial sites, which were often large mounds containing stone and timber chambers, tended to be erected on hilltops or other high ground, far away from where people lived.

Intricate Treasures From Stonehenge Burial: Photos

While Stonehenge was also set apart from housing, it and other later cremation cemeteries tended to be on lower ground near rivers that locals must have frequented.

Pitts said this placement is “perhaps in line with a move from a focus on male lineage and hierarchy to both genders and family or class. This reflects a parallel shift from markers of territory and land (via the barrows) to commemorations of communities.”

As for the culture(s) represented by Stonehenge, Willis said the monument was built about 1,000 years after agriculture arrived from the Middle East. The people had wheat, barley, cattle, pigs, sheep and goats, but no horses yet. They did not yet use wheels, but had well-crafted stone tools. Metalworking spread to Britain at around 2400 B.C., which was well after the early stages of Stonehenge construction.

Stonehenge, now a World Heritage Site, radiates timeless beauty and achievement, but it seems women’s status proved to be more ephemeral.

Willis said that the role of women in society “probably declined again towards the 3rd millennium B.C…both archaeological and historical evidence has shown that women’s status has gone up and down quite noticeably at different times in the past.”

BY JENNIFER VIEGAS – DISCOVERY NEWS

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